propecia yahoo answers

Home » Home, UN NEWS » Why Water-downed UN Resolution on War Rape

Why Water-downed UN Resolution on War Rape

Former president of Kosovo Atifete Jahjaga delivering her speech on violence against women during the war at UN on April 23 - 2019 (Photo by Erol Avdovic - Webpublica)

Atifete Jahjaga, former president of Kosovo 'Photo by Erol Avdovic Webpublicapress 2019)

Pramila Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, addresses the Security Council meeting on women and peace and security, with a focus on sexual violence in conflict. 23 April 2019 (UN photo by Loey Felipe)

Atifete Jahjaga, former president of Kosovo 'Photo by Erol Avdovic Webpublicapress 2019)

Atifete Jahjaga, former president of Kosovo ‘Photo by Erol Avdovic Webpublicapress 2019)

(WEBPUBLICAPRESS) United Nations – New York - The UN Security Council bowed to pressure from the United States after it threatened to veto a German-drafted resolution on rape in conflict. Germany said the resolution still strengthens justice for victims, DW (Deutsche Welle) reported.

But the UN Security Council on Tuesday adopted a watered-down, German-drafted resolution on sexual violence in conflicts after last-minute amendments were added to appease the United States.

The United States was against the resolution due to references to “sexual and reproductive health care” for survivors of rape and abuse in wartime, saying the wording amounted to support for abortion.

Fatal numbers

In a strong statement after Security Council meeting in a separate forum dedicated to the suffering of women during the war in Kosovo in 1999, a former president of this country Atifete Jahjaga at UN ECOSOC chamber in New York again talked about darkest corners of human experience and share painful truths of conflict-related sexual violence. Jahjaga reminded the forum some 20.000 Kosovo women were raped by Serb forces in late 1990-ties., Webpublicapress reported from UN

Former Kosovo president Atifete Jahjaga, the founder of the Jahjaga Foundation, for a long time advocates for the survivors and providing support “during their long road of accessing justice,” and helping them to coup with medical, mental and social conditions.

The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia was the first international tribunal in Europe to convict for rape as a crime against humanity (following Akayesu in Rwanda). According to the ICTY website, it was also “the first international criminal tribunal to enter convictions for rape as a form of torture and for sexual enslavement as a crime against humanity.”

Only in Bosnia and Herzegovina during the war from 1992 to 1995, some 50.000 Bosnian women were raped by Serb forces according to UN estimates. Former U.N.’s Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Margot Wallström, estimated those figures to be 50,000 to 60,000 cases.

Former president of Kosovo Atifete Jahjaga delivering her speech on violence against women during the war at UN on April 23 - 2019 (Photo by Erol Avdovic - Webpublica)

Former president of Kosovo Atifete Jahjaga delivering her speech on violence against women during the war at UN on April 23 – 2019 (Photo by Erol Avdovic – Webpublica)

While not totally accurate data is available the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe estimated that 20,000 women were subjected to rape and other forms of sexual violence. The real number of those who were raped during the 1992-1995 armed conflict will probably never be established.

Certainly, it is not only about numbers, but – as many participants at UN forum said — about a need to put the victims in the center of world attention and to learn the lessons from the previous cases. It is also of utmost importance, as it was said – to “shift shame from victim to rapist.”

Still a weak resolution

German Foreign Minister  Heiko Maas said at UN that the Security Council resolution brought victims to the center of attention.

“The resolution calls on all UN member states to support victims through better access to justice, medical and psychological assistance and reintegration into society,” he said.

In a meantime, the vote on the UN resolution passed 13-0, with veto-wielding permanent members Russia and China abstaining, after Germany was forced to bow to the US pressure and remove the text on sexual and reproductive health.

Pramila Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, addresses the Security Council meeting on women and peace and security, with a focus on sexual violence in conflict. 23 April 2019 (UN photo by Loey Felipe)

Pramila Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, addresses the Security Council meeting on women and peace and security, with a focus on sexual violence in conflict.
23 April 2019 (UN photo by Loey Felipe)

Despite the weakened text, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said the resolution would facilitate the punishment of perpetrators of sexual violence, including applying sanctions, and supporting victims.

Read more: Angelina Jolie and Germany’s Maas demand action on sexual violence (DW).

The resolution also draws attention to victims of sexual violence who have too often been ignored, he said, including men, boys, mothers and children. 

France criticizes US position

The US position drew criticism from other Security Council members, with France’s Ambassador Francois Delattre saying he was “appalled” by the US demand.

It is “inexplicable that access to sexual and reproductive health is not explicitly recognized for victims of sexual violence, who are often the targets of atrocious acts of violence and barbaric mutilation,” he told the 15-member body.

Heiko Maas (Getty Images/D. Angerer)Foreign Minister Heiko Maas is chairing the UN Security Council during Germany’s presidency of the body in April

What does the resolution state?

The resolution expressed concern at “the slow progress” in addressing sexual abuse in conflicts, which occur with impunity “and in some situations have become systematic and widespread, reaching appalling levels of brutality.”

It also urges providing justice for victims, but under pressure from the United States references to the International Criminal Court (ICC) in prosecuting suspected perpetrators of sexual violence were eliminated. The United States is not a member of the ICC out of concern for the sovereignty of US courts and the prospect of war crimes cases being opened against US soldiers and officials.

Read more: How does the International Criminal Court answer criticisms that it is illegitimate?

Nobel Peace Prize winners slam global inaction 

Nobel Peace Prize laureates Nadia Murad and Denis Mukwege called for justice for victims of sexual violence.

Speaking at the UN before the vote, they condemned the international organization’s failure to act.

Also: Syria’s sexual violence survivors seek justice 

“Not a single person has been charged for sexual slavery,” said Murad in reference to the massacres and enslavement of her Yazidi community by the “Islamic State” group in Iraq and Syria.

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres, human rights lawyer Amal Clooney, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Nadia Murad and German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas (Imago/photothek/T. Koehler)
UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, human rights lawyer Amal Clooney, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Nadia Murad and German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas

Short URL: http://webpublicapress.net/?p=30747

Generated image
Image and video hosting by TinyPic
Generated image

FEATURED VIDEOS

FLICKR PHOTO STREAM

© 2019 WebPublicaPress. All Rights Reserved. Log in - Designed by Gabfire Themes