propecia yahoo answers

Home » ARCHIVE, INTERVIEW » Verdict to Mladić is Important for Reconciliation

Verdict to Mladić is Important for Reconciliation

Adama Dieng, Special Advisor on the Prevention of Genocide of the United Nations during the press conference. 10 March 2014. UN Photo by Jean-Marc Ferré

Adama Dieng talking to the press (Courtesy photo for education only)

Adama Dieng UN photo (WPP file)

Adama Dieng, Special Advisor on the Prevention of Genocide of the United Nations during the press conference. 10 March 2014. UN Photo by  Jean-Marc Ferré

Adama Dieng, Special Advisor on the Prevention of Genocide of the United Nations during the press conference. 10 March 2014. UN Photo by Jean-Marc Ferré

Interview by Erol Avdović - The United Nations Under-Secretary-General and Special Adviser for prevention of genocide Adama Dieng, expressed his full satisfaction with the verdict given to Bosnian Serb Commander Ratko Mladić who was sentencend life in prison  for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Dieng told Webpublicapress (WPP) although nothing can erase the horrors of Bosnian war, at least victims “can now have the comfort of knowing that Mr. Mladić will face punishment appropriate to the crimes he committed.”

A worldwide known Senegalese jurist, who was appointed by UN to leads its Office for Prevention of Genocide in September 2012, who also served Registrar of the International UN Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (appointed by UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, in January 2001) also stressed justice alone will not be enough in the Balkan region. Dieng recognized the glorification of war criminals, discrimination and prejudice is a problem – but verdict to Mladić is a important step ahead – toward wished reconciliation.

We spoke with Mr. Dieng in New York on the day the verdict to general Mladić was announced by UN Tribunal in Hague (read here in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian language published in “Dnevni avaz” (www.avaz.ba) .

 

Justice delayed 

 

(Webpublicapress – WPP) The end of work for the UN Tribunal for Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) comes with the verdict delivered against Bosnian Serb general Ratko Mladić who was sentenced life in prison for his role in Bosnian war – including committed acts of genocide: Yet, what do you say to those who say – justice delayed – justice denied? After all, ICTY was working for almost 25 years, since may 1993.

Adama Dieng talking to the press (Courtesy photo for education only)

Adama Dieng talking to the press (Courtesy photo for education only)

Adama Dieng - This verdict renders justice to those who suffered as a result of the atrocity crimes committed by Mr. Mladić. Nothing can erase the horrors of the past, but they can now have the comfort of knowing that Mr. Mladić will face punishment appropriate to the crimes he committed. This verdict provides victims with some measure of redress so that they can move forward with their lives. Prosecutions, even if delayed, recognize the suffering of the victims and their families and contribute to the restoration of some of the dignity or integrity that was lost or severely damaged. Ideally, of course, it is paramount for justice to be timely to be the most impactful and effective. Delays in judicial processes, particularly those that follow events where extreme acts of violence were committed against innocent people, can have several negative effects, not only for the victims as well as to societies and the prevention of future crimes. On the contrary, the confidence that justice has been served and that those responsible for serious crimes are being held accountable helps prevent feelings of frustration, bitterness and the possible desire for revenge of victims, their families and those who share ethnic, religious, racial or national origins.

WPP – You have stated many times that UN and International Community “should strengthen efforts to build inclusive, peaceful societies.” Are you satisfied with this verdict in that particular sense – of building that kind of society in Bosnia and Herzegovina?

Adama Dieng - I have expressed my satisfaction about this verdict. The verdict by the ICTY against Ratko Mladić sends a clear message that there is no space for impunity and that justice will prevail. Criminal accountability is not only about the past but is also about the future. Accountability constitutes a critical component of prevention and also an important step on the path to reconciliation. In a region where we are seeing denial of some of the most heinous crimes committed during the armed conflict and the glorification of war criminals, justice alone will not lead to reconciliation, but there can be no real reconciliation without justice. I hope that this verdict, as well as past decisions by the ICTY, will encourage the region to think about what happened, learn the lessons of the past and chart a future that fully acknowledges those lessons.

 

Comparison with Myanmar

 

WPP - Finally, could this verdict be a rather universal message that there should be no place for racism and xenophobia, ethnic or religion discrimination, since Ratko Mladić was accused for ethnically cleansing Bosnian Muslims — only because they were Muslims?

Adama Dieng – Of course. The work developed throughout these years by the

Adama Dieng UN photo (WPP file)

Adama Dieng UN photo (WPP file)

ad hoc tribunals of the former Yugoslavia and of Rwanda, the work of the hybrid courts in Sierra Leone or Cambodia, and more recently, the work of the International Criminal Court, provide a testimony and account of events that should never be forgotten, so not to be repeated. They certainly send a message that there is no place in our world for the most barbaric acts of discrimination. The lessons that history teaches us are important for our future. Knowing what happened in the past and who was responsible and why, is an invaluable tool to help prevent recurrence, to put in place early warning mechanisms and in general, to develop strategies for prevention of future acts of violence that have discrimination at their core.

WPP – In that context I have to ask you about Myanmar which one can easily compare with recent Bosnian history: The UN High Commissioner for human rights Prince Zeid bin Ra’ad Zeid al-Hussein said the suffering of Rohingya Muslims is ethnic cleansing, and some even say it is a genocide: Does UN and International Community make same “Bosnian mistake” – waiting to long for action? 

Adama Dieng – Each situation is unique and has its own complexities. However, certainly there is a parallel as acts of violence that may amount to international crimes are reportedly being committed against a group because of its religious and ethnic identity. I have been following for years the situation in northern Rakhine state and have warned on several occasions about the risk factors that indicated the potential commission of atrocity crimes in northern Rakhine state. These included very deeply rooted and long-standing discriminatory practices and policies against the Rohingya Muslims population, a failure to stop acts of violence against that group and a failure to put in place conditions that would support the peaceful coexistence of different communities in Rakhine state. Despite the warnings, both the Government of Myanmar as well as the international community have failed their obligations under international law and their responsibilities to protect the Rohingya community from atrocity crimes. Unfortunately, the international community is slow at learning from past mistakes. Inaction to stop these crimes makes us complicit to it.

 

*

Short URL: http://webpublicapress.net/?p=28745

Generated image
Image and video hosting by TinyPic
Generated image

FEATURED VIDEOS

FLICKR PHOTO STREAM

© 2017 WebPublicaPress. All Rights Reserved. Log in - Designed by Gabfire Themes